Family Of Bloomingdale Attack Victim Holds Vigil

Bloomingdale Library Attack Victim Sometimes even a hero needs help, which is the case of our Bloomingdale Attack Victim whose family will be holding a prayer vigil mid-April, recognizing the one-year anniversary of their loved one’s attack.
To be held at the former Easy Bay student’s home, the Saturday, April 18, prayer vigil will be one of solemn remembrance of the night of April 24, 2008 when an 18-year-old girl’s life would be forever changed by alleged assailant Kendrick Morris, now 17, at the Bloomingdale Library. Left badly beaten and blinded, leading to an induced coma in her recovery from the injuries, the young girl has surpassed doctors’ expectations, returning home from rehabilitation in November.
According to her sister, she “is slowly, but steadily improving. We think that she is starting to come out of her plateau and starting to improve at a quicker pace.”
Able to laugh, follow people with her eyes and have some control over her muscles, the 18-year-old is holding true to the spirit of hope that comes with our heroes, showing all that one’s prognosis is not sealed in a field by a library, in a hospital room with doctors, in a rehabilitation facility with physical therapists or even within the walls of one’s own home. It is only sealed with the fight one has within herself, with God’s help, which is why the prayer vigil is to be held.
“The prayer vigil is a reminder to my little sister that there is so much love out there for her. Love is the best medicine she could ever receive,” the victim’s sister states, adding, “And I believe that God answers prayers.”
Acknowledging the impending anniversary of her sister’s trauma, she says, “We want to remind ourselves as well as the community that we should celebrate her life, be grateful for the many blessings and continue to pray for healing. Easter time is also a good time to hold a prayer vigil. Jesus died and rose again so that we could live a whole and fulfilling life. He is the ultimate Healer.”
And healing is what is hoped to come to the wheelchair-bound girl, who is receiving nourishment through a feeding tube. Gaining strength day by day, she may be able to eat solid foods in the coming months and has involuntarily started to say the word “mom.” Needing 24-hour care, her family continues to pick up the slack for the eight hours the insurance company cut from the girl, leaving only 16 hours of coverage.
If all home healthcare is diminished, the family hopes a home health aid or agency might come forth to donate their time to the girl. She also spoke of the need for rehab equipment and says the family is willing to try any therapy that may help the victim’s odds of improvement.
Sometimes, even the most delicate of heroes, like Peter Pan’s Tinkerbell, just need our belief and prayer that they will get better…so, to all those out there who believe in the power of prayer, take a moment on Saturday, April 18, and everyday forward, to say a quick prayer for this everyday hero who is facing a battle each day and who is prompting the story for a happy ending!
“I am amazed that her story is still alive and on people’s minds everyday,” says the sister. “It’s such a beautiful thing, and I’ve learned so much about love, friendship and hope throughout this past year. God has truly blessed us.”
To learn more about the 1 p.m. prayer vigil, email BloomingdaleLibraryVictim@gmail.com. If you would like to make a donation, visit any SunTrust Bank with a check made payable to the Bloomingdale Library Attack Victim Fund. Or, if you would like to volunteer your time, call Cheryl Zemina, a close friend of the family’s, at 695-1412. Until then, visit www.bloomingdalelibraryattackvictim.com to blog or see what upcoming fundraising events are in the works. As of now, residents are welcome to purchase a “Faith, Hope, Love: Everyone’s Friend, Everyone’s Daughter” T-shirt for $10 by email to help with medical costs.