Staff Report

A day in the classroom, playing out on the field after school, and completing homework at night requires the right foods to fuel such activities. But unhealthy choices lurk around every corner, making the task of getting kids to eat a balanced and healthful diet a daunting one.

FishHawk resident Denise Graf, who has two school age children said, “When it comes to what ‘simple’ snacks my kids love, we go back to natural snacks … good old almonds, apples and grapes. At home, their favorite ‘simple snack’ is sliced apples (or bananas) with either peanut butter, or almond butter, on top. Anyone can make healthy choices.” Graf said to stop buying boxed foods and then see what options you have. Sometimes you don’t even realize what delicious (and healthy) snacks you have had all along, until you get rid of the boxed options.

“There is nothing inconvenient about almonds, apples or grapes,” Graf said.

“Junk food is winning the war on grabbing the attention of Americans, particularly our kids,” said Jeff Dunn, president and CEO of Bolthouse Farms. “Our hope is to drive a lasting love of better-for-you foods that kids want to eat and moms can feel good about.”

Snack time tips

  • Look for easy options: Every busy parent knows that getting more fruits and vegetables into their kid’s diet isn’t easy — and spending an evening chopping up snacks may not be an option.
  • Keep healthy options on hand: Make smart snacking easy by always having better-for-you food choices readily available and easy for even the youngest eaters to serve themselves.
  • Send them off with sensible sweets: It’s easy to swap junk food sweets with other choices that allow kids to still enjoy their favorite flavors.
  • Practice proper portions: When packing a lunch or snack, always follow recommended serving guidelines and place only that amount in a re-sealable baggie or lunchbox.

Follow these tips to properly fuel your student and they’ll learn nutrition essentials for a healthier future. For more ideas to get your kids to eat better, visit www.bolthousefarms.com.