By Michelle Caceres

Not every boy who joins a Boy Scout troop earns the Eagle Scout rank; only about seven percent of all Boy Scouts do so. In Boy Scout Troop 266, who meet at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ church building on Bell Shoals Rd., six scouts will soon earn the Eagle rank and be counted among those select scouts.

Newsome students Giovanni Beegen, Tyler Safsten, Spencer Caceres, Noah Bouton and Nick Hunter and Newsome graduate Michael Meadows, who have an accumulated 50 years’ participation in the scouting program, will earn the Eagle Scout rank.

“I feel accomplished, like I’ve made a positive contribution to my community,” said Safsten, who started in the scouting program at 8-years-old.

The highest advancement rank in Scouting, a Boy Scout must fulfill requirements in the areas of leadership, service and outdoor skills. He advances through the ranks- Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class, Star, Life and Eagle- by passing specific tests that are organized by requirements and merit badges. An Eagle candidate has earned a minimum of 21 merit badges, served six months in a troop leadership position, taken part in a scoutmaster conference and successfully completed an Eagle Scout board of review. He has also planned, developed and gave leadership to a service project.

Beegan built a retaining wall and planter for Veterans Alternative in Holiday. Bouton organized the school beautification project at FishHawk Creek Elementary School. Meadows performed trail restoration at Alderman’s Ford Park. Hunter built fencing around garbage container at A Kid’s Place. Caceres and Safsten collected photos of gravestones and uploaded the information to a genealogy website.

“I learned how difficult leadership can be but it can also be rewarding if done right,” Bouton said.

FishHawk resident and Troop 266 Scoutmaster Matt Bouton is proud of the hard work, dedication and leadership the boys have shown in completing their eagle projects and for the example that they are for the rest of the troop and the community.

“These boys are service-oriented and have a willingness to serve each other and their community,” he said.

For more information, visit www.scouting.org.